Droning On and another Toy

Another drift to the dark side I am afraid.

I bought a drone.

Yes I know ….. Lots of reasons why I justified it to myself and I went through the prior post decision making process and got a ‘yes’ as a result.

Seriously I have been considering one for sometime.   In France the house sits looking out over a valley and we often see deer and foxes (but not yet a wild boar) and I have always hankered for being able to get up close to them.  France aside my work on turret clocks often needs a close view of the clock face without the hassle of ladders and scaffolding.   So two good reasons (in my book anyway).

I had been watching the market trying to decide when to jump.  The two big players for the semi professional market are DJI and Parrot.   Both these run out expensive.   Then in January I got a mailshot from Banggood about a new device to be launched by Fimi called the X8 SE.   This seemed to be only available from Banggood and was on back order status.    I missed out on the first delivery but finally my toy arrived last week.   

It is amazing.  And at a fantastic price.

Not ever owning a drone before I cannot compare with anything but it is so easy to drive and has so many automated flying routines.   Battery life is around 30 minutes and range is stated as 4km and it can skim along at 18m/s speed (yes that is 65km/hr ….).    It does 4k video and 12M stills.

So that is my entertainment sorted for summer, should summer finally arrive.

fimi x8 SE drone and controller
Fimi Drone and associated controller.

It is worth watching Dustin Dunhill on YouTube if you want a serious review of the device.  He does tech reviews and there are 3 or 4 Fimi videos on his platform.

Similar or related subjects : –

    The Gravity of the Village Clock

    Some time ago I made mention of getting involved with the running of the village clock.   There was an added incentive as this was a Cooke of York movement dating back to 1869.  Anything associated with the  City of York is always of high interest as it was my birth place.  That is except the soccer team but I try not to get drawn into that discussion.

    Back to the clock.  Myself and a colleague in the village have been working on the clock to bring it back to time.  We were getting pretty close.   Then it stopped.   Despite a few restarts it refused to run for any length of time.

    We rolled up our sleeves and gave it a thorough visual inspection.   We were just about to leave it for the day when we spotted that the pins on the pin wheel on the gravity escapement arbor seemed very tight to the arbor supporting bracket.   Closer inspection revealed one pin of the five seemed to be slightly at an angle.  Even closer inspection showed a visible witness mark on the bracket where the pin or pins were rubbing on the bracket.   There was no mechanism to centre the arbor away from the bracket.   

    We decided to remove the arbor complete with pin wheel, fly etc.   This was fairly straightforward.  A single screw at the opposite end to the escapement arms could be unfastened and the arbour came free.  Except it wasn’t that easy to unscrew as the screwdriver slot was very narrow.

    Having got the arbor assembly back to my workshop I discovered two of the pins were lose, one of them to the point of falling out.   It seemed to have been held in place from coming out any further by the support bracket.   

    I marked and numbered the escapement legs and removed each pin in turn, shortened each by 0.5mm, degreased the threads on each pin and its associated mounting hole and then refitted each one with a dab of Loctite to hold them in place. 

    Spinning the arbor in my hand I could now see that all pins looked parallel and the length was much more consistent.  Hopefully the pins will now comfortably clear the mounting bracket.

    The gravity escapement arbor showing the five escapement legs and the five pins that needed shortening

    To make refitting easier I made a small hand tool to fit the slot on the mounting screw and used a hacksaw blade as a pseudo screwdriver blade to more easily turn and tighten the screw.

    Since refitting the arbor the clock was running slightly slowly so we removed a penny from the weight tray and it now seems pretty much spot on.

    Similar or related subjects : –

    A Lazy Cable Clamp using 3D Printing

    This is nothing magic but worth a mention.   Being fundamentally lazy I don’t like to assemble and solder electronic multi-way connectors.   There is never enough room to work on the contacts and the cables never lay up how you would like them to.  This could have course be a function of my eyesight ..

    I am currently working on boxing and installing the Tormach USB Expansion Board which has a USB connector interface.   I wanted the cable to pass through some form of gland into the box but didn’t want to cut a standard USB cable and remake the connector at one end of the other.   

    After some head scratching I came up with the following simple cable gland/cable grip.  It is nothing revolutionary but made life easy and the parts only took 20 minutes to design in Fusion 360 and then 3D print on the Sindoh 3DWOX.

    It has two identical semicircular halves that hold the cable and there is a ring that pushes over these on the outside of the box.   A small flange holds these in place on the inside of the box. The hole in the box and the ring inside diameter are both 16mm to allow the USB connector largest dimension to pass through.   This is also one of the standard cut rings on a cone cut hole drill which makes cutting the hole in the box very straightforward.

    The component parts (two halves and the retaining ring)
    Inside view of the gland showing the retaining shoulder on the two halves
    Outside view of the cable gland showing the retaining ring

    Not rocket science but you never know it might come in useful and the dimensions can be tweaked to suit other cables and connectors. Similar or related subjects : –

    A Bit off Piste – An eventful flight to Toulouse

    This has nothing to do with model engineering but thought you might find it amusing/interesting.

    Following my wife having spotted some low cost tickets to Toulouse from London Gatwick, we decided to make a quick trip to France to check out that all at our house was OK. The flight bookings were with a well known budget airline that has orange corporate colours. 

    We checked in OK and the flight pulled away from the stand dead on time but 5 minutes later we were back where we started from.   As the Captain said ‘one of his shortest flights’.   Apparently a critical sensor in the port engine had gone AWOL.  Technicians were called and we sat for 2 hours on the plane while they analysed and fixed the problem.

    Off we went once again but having missed our takeoff slot we were now at the back of the taxi queue.  Finally we were sat at the end of the runway and the brakes were released …. only for pandemonium to break out in the cabin.   The crew started rushing round and shouting to stay in our seats.   The take off was aborted and we sat mid runway.    Within minutes the plane was surrounded by all manner of fire appliances. 

    Apparently a passenger’s lithium power tank had burst into flames.  I guess his or her laptop or phone’s battery had died while we were waiting for the sensor to be fixed and while topping up from the power tank the charging current surge had upset things.   The crew had been quick to put the offending article in a fire proof box.

    After blocking the runway for 6 minutes, we were escorted off the runway by the fire crew vehicles to a quiet area of the airfield.  A team of fireman boarded the plane and took away the offending article. 

    While 6 minutes does not seem long there would have been a lot of landings and takeoffs blocked.  Had we been airborne when the smoke appeared we could have been sliding down escape slides and the weather outside would not have made that much fun.

    Because there had been an incident the airline procedure required that the crew had to be changed so they could be debriefed.   We were therefore now faced the delay while a new crew was found.   Further to this an offer was made that anyone wanting to leave the flight could do so (they didn’t ask for ‘any passengers of a nervous or superstitious disposition’).   A number of passengers decided this was the best option.  This meant a baggage crew had to be found to find their bags in the hold.   So we had a baggage crew and a flight crew to wait for.

    When the new crew arrived they had to search the cabin to match bags to passengers to ensure nothing owned by the departing passengers had been left behind (suspicious or otherwise).

    After a total delay of 5 hours (still sitting in our allocated seats), we finally got airborne for Toulouse.

    I won’t extend your boredom by telling you about the hire car shambles on our arrival.

    We think we might think twice about flying to Toulouse another time but I have to say all credit to the flight crew, the technicians and the fire services for their swift and professional actions.

    Postscript : – better to travel hopefully ….. we then had a 3 hour delay on the way home.   Weather at Gatwick delayed the flight out to Toulouse.  Think we will stick to the ferry next time.

    Similar or related subjects : –

    tado° Update

    The Tado system is now installed in France and it is working rather well.   I have installed the wireless thermostat in the downstairs entrance and this now controls the boiler via a relay control box next to the boiler.   The upstairs area now has its radstats set to less than half way open and we have also been able to turn the downstairs radiators down.

    We now have a much more balanced temperature throughout the house and don’t go to bed freezing cold.   Now the fabric of the building has got up to a uniform temperature the boiler seems to be firing less.   Having the smartphone application for remote operation is an additional bonus.  Very pleased with the result.  Nice kit.

    Similar or related subjects : –